No Change Please…We’re British

Here’s a happy thought for Yes campaigners. They have already won the argument against the Union…the problem is they still haven’t convinced the Scots. It may be that this formulation of apparently contradictory effects is the reason the polls so far are stuck in neutral and a sense of gradual movement is hard to detect.

Take the first part of the equation. Is there a rational person – as opposed to the determinedly committed – who still says Scotland can’t do it? It isn’t so long ago, in the pre devolution age, that a belief in Scotland’s almost total ineptitude was the conventional view. We were totally and hopelessly dependent – and weirdly untroubled by it – on the British Establishment whose agents we respected in the shape of a Scottish Office, often including unelected pantomime toffs – Lords  Glenarthur, Mansfield, Sanderson or Strathclyde, anyone? Devolutionists were a rag tag of ne’er-do-wells and the disenfranchised fed up with opposition. As for the dangerous dreamers of the SNP…

But since Scotland has demonstrated, rather than postulated a confident capacity to legislate in it’s own interests and move in a divergent direction, it is only flat-earth ears who say it can’t be done today. Largely unnoticed the official line has been changed by the facts and is now a completely different formulation that says: Of course Scotland can do it but is it worth it? That’s a completely different proposition based on reality. A binding agreement (on the face of it) is signed by the British state to guarantee that independence if there is a simple majority.

All that is left to the No Change brigade is to show how devoid they are imagination, inspiration, belief and pride by running down Scotland’s prospects to make independence appear too risky. For me the proof that they are finished in terms of argument is two-fold. One, they are now reduced to hiding the truth. This comes in the form of allowing their leader to duck out of the one major head-to-head event of the entire three-year campaign which could have commanded total national attention and revealed the true divide between the sides…Cameron versus Salmond live on television across the United Kingdom. I still find it jaw-dropping that this has been dismissed as not being the role for the leader of the United Kingdom, a man who will fight tooth and nail for Union and whose sole political skill is presentational. Editors have allowed him to slip out of this in another demonstration of supine complicity by a media still exhibiting 1950s deference to the British state.  I suspect this may become unsustainable though as the polls tighten and the London media which does have the balls to take on Downing Street starts to get frightened of the outcome. Backed by hysterical backbenchers, it is entirely possible that cowardly Cameron will be pleading for a pop at Salmond before voting day.

Second, London’s refusal to take up Brussel’s invitation for clarification on the attitude the institutions will take and the approach we can expect to our membership is the kind of sleight of hand the same brave Scottish media would have lambasted Salmond for. They did after all make a mockery of Salmond not having asked about membership when the freedom of information row was filling their pages. But now when there is a clear course of action to enlighten the voters, they shrug with indifference. Where is Catherine Stihler when you need her?

Taken together these two denials of openness and democratic choice, along with the unsubtle failure to be honest about currency union, demonstrate they have nothing to gain from revealing the truth while protesting it is Salmond who won’t give answers. That hypocritical ruse is their only cover left.

While the uncritical media dutifully report the remarks of a self interest player in Spain, knowledgeable voices are getting through to offer clarity on the real story of EU membership, the latest the unrivalled EU expert John Palmer.

Even the much vaunted, by Unionists, IFS figures confirmed that Scotland was in a better economic position than Britain and it is only looking years ahead and only if all British government estimates are accurate that a budgetary squeeze kicks in by which time Scotland can act to step up economic activity and head off demographic changes.

I know many will believe the claims that Scotland still can’t make a success of independence but where are those arguments convincingly made? Increasingly it is the Alistairs who make wild assertions and unsubstantiated claims, not their opponents who now point to the Independence Bible (it’s Sunday) to make their case in the knowledge the Nos have nothing to counter it with. Do you hear cogent arguments made by ordinary Scots apart from a weak and generalized: We’re probably better together?

But why isn’t opinion turning? I think the problem is a large percentage of Scots who aren’t applying logic at all. It isn’t that they are following the detailed debate as such, it is that they have no concept of their country as anything other than what is has been throughout their lifetime, a part of Britain that used to be something special and with plenty of off-the-shelf history but not a place that could conceivably equal other countries. They see Scotland as not a country at all but the way it is seen from London, as a region with history and some differences but, like all subsidiary units, not an equal for the founding nation. It leads to disbelieving outbursts accompanied by furrowed foreheads about “Scotland…a nation. Don’t be ridiculous” sometimes followed with “I’ll emigrate if that happens”.  They have been consumed by the British message and have allowed it to demolish what remained of their separate sense of national worth. It is the total success of Britishness which has supplanted their national identity, reduced it to a leisure activity (sport) and rendered them unable to envisage Scotland for what historically and legally it is, a nation like all others which merged in alliance with a bigger neighbour and now may want to rearrange that relationship to suit modern needs. They are not listening to the argument, as is their right, and they probably don’t listen at election time either preferring to believe nothing will change so why bother.

I doubt if many people really do believe the argument that Scotland is better off in Britain, a point daily being dismantled by reports showing personal debt approaching £1.5 trillion – equalling sovereign debt. Families are borrowing to pay utility bills while bankers earn 35 per cent pay rises to £1.6m a year. The government subsidises mortgages for the rich and has to be stopped by the Bank of England before another bubble is created – guess where?

But my No cohort doesn’t connect any of this to their own country or their own vote. It is something that happens to them and they can’t change.  They won’t see either the desperate Tory and Lib Dem moves to begin campaigning for continued EU membership because the polls show a real possibility of the UK voting us out.

Yes campaigners can argue all they like but I wonder how many of the Don’t Knows are actually Don’t Cares and Won’t Cares, people for whom there is no political message that gets through and for whom the idea of Scotland as their country is as relevant a flight to Mars.

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0 thoughts on “No Change Please…We’re British

  1. Hopefully, the “Don’t Cares” and the “Won’t Cares” won’t vote – with respect Derek i’m not convinced you are right. More and more people are asking more and more questions! Possibly the dishonest critique from the Press and the “impartial” BBC Scotland is getting to you!

  2. Hi Derek, we are seeing and meeting more and more people who are saying:

    ‘I am intending to look into it. It needs to be good for my whole family. ‘
    ‘We don’t trust what the politicians and the BBC are saying’
    ‘There has to be something better than Westminster, but I need to look at the details.’
    ‘My mate’s really into it and I keep promising him that I will sit down with him.’
    ‘I have to take the time to get more information. I don’t want to waste my vote.’

    I was out yesterday all day at an academic independence function. There were still a few Unionists trying to push the EU, Currency and NATO myths… That alone informs us of the desperation and lack of case for the Union… People sense that. This constant denial and obfuscation of common sense things, is sending plenty of warning signals to the undecided.

    Yesterday, I talked to a sheep farmer, barmaid, three 16 years old, taxi driver, dentist. Yep, its anecdotal… but at the end of the day I was feeling very positive indeed.

    If each of us continues to:

    – Post and tweet articles like yours, wingsoverscotland, YESScotland and decisive government papers
    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmselect/cmfaff/writev/643/m05.htm

    – Speak to everyone who will listen and point them in the direction of proper info

    – highlight Westminster and UK problems (and deceit)

    – Talk Scotland up. Stress all the positives

    I think there is a fair chance we will open enough hearts and minds before September next year.

    Keep up the brilliant blog and don’t expect a knighthood anytime soon.

    Regards

  3. Wonderful tribute in Glasgow RCH with RSNO, Aly Bain, Phil Cunningham, young Pipers (and Drums), Hannah ? – wonderful young singer with young fiddlers from ‘conservatoire’. The final ‘auld lang syne’ was truly moving on day after terrible events at Clutha.

    • Pity about ‘lady from Mearns’ mouthing about ‘wee eck’ and his Edinburgh tram fiasco! (wasn’t it Jack Mcconnell and loyal opposition to minority SNP government who forced the trams through?) Clearly the GRCH is a ‘better together employer’ that allows junior staff to address public with clearly inaccurate ( No, wrong) smalltalk. I carry no ‘card’ for FM but, surely we can expect better from our great Public enterprises.

  4. Seems the McLean Clan are for YES.

  5. Yes Indeed Eric!

  6. For the last few months, I’ve hardly bothered with the BBC except Radio Scotland. (Don’t have a TV, live in the country.) Now when I hear an English accent – a proper BBC voice – it’s odd, because while I used by force of habit to associate that sound with Authority, it really does just seem like what it is, a different way of talking. And what goes along with it too, just seems like a different way of filling space – though generally a good deal more of it.

    Mind you I don’t necessarily associate the BBC with Authority – nor those Westminster mouthpieces you mention – never mind Truth. The opportunism that is clearly so much a part of the way that politicians and their media supporters deal with such things has never been so clear to me in listening to them and reading them recently, and then finding out the reality elsewhere – and then hearing how they change their tune. In fact the changed response I mention is doubtless also because I have been reading this and other blogs.

    Another commentator in this thread says you yourself shouldn’t expect to be knighted – but why not? Those things are contingent. There will still be a Monarchy after independence (should that come). In a sense this comment inadvertently proves the opposite point. The politicians and media will come round too if we want them to. We can make our own minds (and heroes) up.

    If we want to stay in our accustomed place, oor wee bit hoosie, you seem to be saying, no amount of falsehood or truth will have any impact, wherever it comes from. (I’m not going to follow that up by overdoing it with references to the Burns poem, though the tone of your article reminded me slightly of the weary ending of ‘Of Mice and Men’, and we do know that a cruel coulter is being made ready to whack us in the Barnetts, if we’re not careful.)

    It’s all a matter of seeing and hearing things differently. Of making a decision and starting over (as much as we need to) from there. Failing again, as Samuel Beckett said, but failing better. And doing our neighbours no harm at all in the process. They can still have all the Lords and Ladies they want, just like ourselves. They’ll just talk different.

    Arise, Sir Derek.

  7. Richard Laybourne

    “The government subsidises mortgages for the rich and has to be stopped by the Bank of England before another bubble is created – guess where?” This is the exact opposite of the truth. The government introduced a scheme for allowing those at the start of their house-owning aspirations to get a help up the first rung of the ladder, and IMMEDIATELY handed management of this to the Bank of England so the decisions about its future would be purely economic and never political. It is precisely those who have just taken out a mortgage who would be the most vulnerable to a bubble, not the super-rich who are mortgage free. Such a nonsensical, throw-away comment at the end of your blog casts doubts on the veracity and validity of the rest of it.

    • Hi Richard
      Thanks for getting in touch. I don’t always reply directly because everybody has a point of view which I welcome but since you suggest everything else I’ve written may be compromised by your interpretation of the government’s help to buy scheme, I should illuminate. The scheme offers a guarantee for those able to raise the deposit on properties up to £600,000. The average price of a house in Scotland is £153,000. To me, that means the scheme is helping the rich. The government insists you must be able to make the mortgage payments on such an amount which by definition makes you rich. Unless of course you think mortgages of what? £2000 – £2500 a month aren’t paid by the rich? (This is another London centric measure that says bugger the rest of the country). As for the government IMMEDIATELY handing control to the Bank of England I enclose a letter from Andrew Tyrie MP chairman of the Treasury Select Committee to Mark Carney asking for clarification on that point. Turns out the BofE’s role is advisory, unless Carney is wrong of course.
      In the letter Carney confirmed the Financial Planning Committee (FPC) has been asked by the chancellor George Osborne to offer advice to HM Treasury if an extension of Help to Buy is proposed after three years.

      Carney said: ““If an extension were to be considered, the chancellor would ask the FPC to assess the impact on financial stability and, in this regard, assess whether a continuation of the scheme could pose a risk to financial stability. It would be for the government to decide the course of action in response to this advice.”

      The FPC will also contribute to an annual review of the ongoing impact of the Help to Buy scheme every September starting in 2014.

      Carney stressed that the FPC has no power to ask HM Treasury to vary the terms of, or close, the Help to Buy scheme but it can make recommendations regarding the scheme at any time.

      The FPC will consider the merits of any changes to Help to Buy “in the context of its assessment of the risks to financial stability arising from the housing market and the use of the considerable range of other tools over which it has influence.”

      Tyrie commented: “This letter is a step forward: it brings some much needed clarity to the government’s Help to Buy Scheme. We now know who is responsible for what.

      “The Bank of England has no power of veto over Help to Buy. Responsibility for it lies with the government.”
      Keep reading. Derek

      • Richard Laybourne

        Thanks for taking the time to reply, Derek. I think the £600k limit recognises that it’s a UK-wide initiative, so the average price in Scotland isn’t really relevant. Indeed, the argument could be made that it would help more people in Scotland than anywhere else where houses are more expensive precisely because the Scottish average is so much lower – not sure how that squares with your “bugger the rest of the country” assertion. It’s a touch disingenuous to point to the upper limit and build an argument around only that figure. That’s the upper limit, not the amount you must borrow to be eligible. How about we compromise and agree it helps all first time buyers, including rich first time buyers?

        In your first post you say that “The government subsidises mortgages for the rich and has to be stopped by the Bank of England”, but in your rebuttal argue that the BofE only has any advisory role. Which is it?

        It’s good to see proper debate, and thank you for not ‘moderating’ my post into oblivion!

        • Richard
          Any taxpayer scheme that applies a subsidy either directly or by guarantee to the purchase of property valued at £600,000 is helping the rich (as well as others). That price is four times the average value in parts of the UK – Scotland – and is squarely aimed at London which is where a bubble has been created and is the reason for the Bank’s intervention. So it is designed to bugger the rest. House prices in some areas of the north of England are even lower than Scotland. Your point hardly amounts to a reason to doubt everything else in the post. I note you are now asking a different question having had the first ones answered. The Guardian said Carney had stepped in and obliged Osborne to change the scheme but I don’t work in the Bank of England so I report what I read.
          Rather than finding a loose piece of wool and attempting to untangle the whole garment, a favourite trick of our friend Grahamski, how about giving us your view on the thrust of the post? Everybody on here wants to hear from sensible Unionists. Are you one? Are you a Yes voter and would you like to share your views on the big question? That’s what we’re thirsting for, a sense of what people think on either side so we can understand the debate better.
          Good luck with your mortgage application.
          Kind regards
          Derek

    • cynicalHighlander

      “The government subsidises mortgages for the rich and has to be stopped by the Bank of England before another bubble is created – guess where?” This is the exact opposite of the truth.

      No it’s not as the Gov has backed any defaulters on paying their mortgage by £12 billion being taken from cuts in the welfare budget. A mortgage is debt and every debt taken out, no matter where puts free money into the bankers hands allowing leveraging it up to 10 sometimes 100 times that value them to buy government bonds gamble/ fix the markets which devalues the pound overall. Our money supply in control of a government ruled by the bankers means that they they can borrow indefinitely devaluing the currency i.e. stealing money from the majority of its citizens and further enriching those at the top just like Mugabe did. We live in a very corrupt financial system set up and changed by the elite giving them funny names to deliberately confuse everyone else including chancellors.

      Look at how the IMF was set up Johann Hari: It’s not just Dominique Strauss-Kahn. The IMF itself should be on tria

      To understand this story, you have to reel back to the birth of the IMF. In 1944, the countries that were poised to win the Second World War gathered in a hotel in rural New Hampshire to divvy up the spoils. With a few honourable exceptions, like the great British economist John Maynard Keynes, the negotiators were determined to do one thing. They wanted to build a global financial system that ensured they received the lion’s share of the planet’s money and resources. They set up a series of institutions designed for that purpose – and so the IMF was delivered into the world.

  8. For the last few months, I’ve hardly bothered with the BBC except Radio Scotland. (Don’t have a TV, live in the country.) Now when I hear an English accent – a proper BBC voice – it’s odd, because while I used by force of habit to associate that sound with Authority, it really does just seem like what it is, a different way of talking. And what goes along with it too, just seems like a different way of filling space – though generally a good deal more of it.

    Mind you I don’t necessarily associate the BBC with Authority – nor those Westminster mouthpieces you mention – never mind Truth. The opportunism that is clearly so much a part of the way that politicians and their media supporters deal with such things has never been so clear to me in listening to them and reading them recently, and then finding out the reality elsewhere – and then hearing how they change their tune. In fact the changed response I mention is doubtless also because I have been reading this and other blogs.

    Another commentator in this thread says you yourself shouldn’t expect to be knighted – but why not? Those things are contingent. There will still be a Monarchy after independence (should that come). In a sense this comment inadvertently proves the opposite point. The politicians and media will come round too if we want them to. We can make our own minds (and heroes) up.

    If we want to stay in our accustomed place, oor wee bit hoosie, you seem to be saying, no amount of falsehood or truth will have any impact, wherever it comes from. (I’m not going to follow that up by overdoing it with references to the Burns poem, though the tone of your article reminded me slightly of the weary ending of ‘Of Mice and Men’, and we do know that a cruel coulter is being made ready to whack us in the Barnetts, if we’re not careful.)

    It’s all a matter of seeing and hearing things differently. Of making a decision and starting over (as much as we need to) from there. Failing again, as Samuel Beckett said, but failing better. And doing our neighbours no harm at all in the process. They can still have all the Lords and Ladies they want, just like ourselves. They’ll just talk different.

    Arise, Sir Derek.

  9. sorry – was using a different computer and have now posted the comment from the other one. So, DELETE the earlier one, please! Thanks

  10. Thanks Derek, you have given me a wee lift when I really needed it (or a boot up the Khyber). The lies, deceit and downright negativity from the establishment, media, press, and apathy from to many of Scotland’s population takes it’s toll. You are I believe correct in your assessment of where we are at this moment in time and if we hold the line against the onslaught of the unionist lies we will ultimately prevail, morally if nothing else.

    My old man used to tell me the darkest hour comes before the dawn, and I found that to be true. You are right the BT crew have been found to have nothing left in their locker and things are changing because they have to. A lot of the population think they are just going to leave things as they are. Well that ain’t on the table and as you say the establishment are going to start answering a lot of very tricky questions or get shown up as the kings new clothes, that could be very revealing!

    Again Derek thanks, sorry for we moan. Pipers strike up “THE BLACK BEAR”

  11. Derek, what is your view of the EU letter stooshie? Do you think BBC Scotland deliberately buried the letter or was it incompetence? Was Brian Taylor only obeying orders or did he make the decision to pretend that nobody knew who the letter was addressed to?

  12. I think you are right Derek. There is a hardcore British Bulldog element in Scotland. However they are only about 15-20% of the population. Then there are the 90 minute Scots. We see them at the rugger and football matches. Bursting lungs with pride singing Flower of Scotland and then voting for another country to control their country they are so proud of. They are the majority of the other no’s. In fact probably about 35% of our population are shortbread Burns supper Scots. We all know them. That’s why I don’t get that excited at watching Scotland anymore as I want something better than winning a game. So there are probably only about 40% of Scots and that’s being generous who are Scots first second and last. Yes have their vote in the main. However how do they capture the pretendy don’t really care Scots to seal a majority. By doing exactly what they are doing. Rightly or wrongly by letting them keep some of their Britishness and then appealing to their bank balance. It’s not ideal but Salmond worked out a long time agom that’s how you get there. Remember that it’s the destination that’s important not the journey. The destination will change after independence as generations grow up outwith Britain and lose any sense of it. Salmond is right Derek he knows what he is doing as frustrating as it seems to us sometimes. He’s got us this far and we must have faith.

  13. Spot on Eric McLean! I’ve said before that a large part of the problem is that the press and media are part of that British Establishment and too many of our people read the wrong papers and/or listen to biased media commentators. They don’t get to listen to folk like yourself Derek or the writings of people like Bell and MacWhirter or latterly even McKenna in the guardian. That’s why Eric is spot on – its down to us and our like to utilise the social media and e-mail to good effect. Build on this approach developed by the YES campaign and circumvent the establishment and its tame poodle press and media. Eventually I’m sure as tempsbizarre suggests ; the press and media will come round to our view especially if they realise they’re in danger of isolation from an increasingly well informed public.

    I’m quite prepared to be labelled a Referendum Bore with friends and family; but you know, increasingly I’m sensing quite a few beginning to wake up to the information I’m bombarding them with through facebook, Twitter, email etc.
    There’s plenty of great stuff out there with YES campaign, Youtube interviews , debates etc, Business for Scotland blogs . Labour for Independence blogs ; Poles for Independence etc, etc and by no means least, correspondents like your goodself and others which can really start people thinking – if they get to hear about it.
    It’s down to us I reckon to get that message out there.

  14. This chimes with me, the information is all there but still the undecideds can’t or won’t decide. Obviously the partisan media do not help but what to do, stay positive I guess. The thing I find most irritating and I have heard quite often now is a undecided say something along the lines of ‘well I don’t know anything about it or I don’t care about it so of course I am going to vote no’. I know it is their right but I find this tragic, to me the more appropriate response would be ‘so I am not going to vote’.

  15. If you ‘don’t care about it’ why on earth would you even bother, even if it’s a postal vote?
    It’s easier to be positive than negative ………. that’s what Salmond is depending on.and I think he’s right.
    To be perfectly frank I don’t believe what the polls are saying.

  16. Dave McEwan Hill

    I am buoyed by last week’s events and I think we have arrived at a tipping point. It is only in retrospect however that you see the tipping point and we move into a politically sterile time of year so it maybe in the New Year that we can look back and see what was achieved last week The White Paper laid out the ground on which we will fight the election but we are not fighting it as yet. We are sorting our defences and making sure we are properly armed. At the moment some of our people are just waking up. More and more of them are understanding they have been lied to and are being lied to. That alone is enough to secure their vote. Eventually only the really blind will be able to believe Better Together. Of course some who know that Better Together is lying think that is OK and will still vote NO. We will never get them. But we will get many more who are politically unsophisticated and who look to other, wiser people moving towards us. And when the campaign moves into the aspirational we are engaging at a level that Better Together cannot match . God knows what it will do but I don’t imagine it will be pleasant. I am not surprised at the vitriol being poured on Eddi Reader. Her politically unsophisticated contribution to QT hit all he right buttons with many of the people we have to win over

  17. Following on with the point about the don’t knows.I heard the comment on QT as well from the don’t know lady.Er well I am waiting to decide as there isn’t enough info out yet.Absolute garbage.Get aff yer backside and go and read a book,read this blog ,look at the recent history of this nation.It’s all there if you have the savvy and wit to think for yourself.She wasn’t a young lassie she was over 50.The spoon fed generation want a personal slave to read all the facts and then send them a personal report to decide.It’s so frustrating hearing that kind of comment.Really what else is not in the 670 page white paper!I come across folk every day like this.We I don’t do politics types.This is why the media are so powerful.Because so many Scots just accept headlines as facts.They don’t think ,hang on I’m going to check that.

  18. I think the yes campaign is now beginning to make one thing very clear and that is that neither side can absolutely guarantee anything. The YES want change and up till now they have been the ones that have had to try and justify everything. The NO never entertained the idea that they might one day have to tell us about the future after a no vote. I think a lot more people are now asking what they mean when they say nothing will change. People want positive vision of the future after NO and they want more than some bland statement of business as usual.

    The white paper gives details without certainties but it also says to the NO campaign, “Ok where are your details and what guarantees can you give us?” To those of us who knew that the NO campaign was a disorganised rabble of hot air nothing much has changed except the clothes have come off and underneath the old bones are now exposed to the fresh air. I’ll be surprised if Alistair Carmichael is still in post by the end of the Spring even though there’s little talent waiting in the wings. Cameron might yet have to step forward.

    Oh and if you want the Cameron / Salmond debate then you could at least sign this to try and help things move along.

    Petition for a televised debate between the Prime Minister and First Minister of Scotland, regarding Scottish independence.

    http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/55155

  19. I find that many people appear to be quietly considering a YES vote but don’t have the confidence to voice their thoughts. When approached, however, with the many positive arguments they slowly emerge as clearly in favour of Scottish Independence. So, have faith, Derek !

  20. Oh well, that was depressing.

  21. Regarding the mortgage subsidy, if you are rich, you pay the deposit for son/daughter, they ‘purchase’ a house near the £600,000 mark, ‘they’ get a subsidy,you sell for a million. Have I misunderstood the concept?

  22. In answer to your question Derek, as to why the majority simply don’t get the “logic” of it, I think your former employer and the rest of MSM in Scotland have a lot to do with it.

    The Yes campaign can shout from the rooftops from now ’til September, but because the front page headlines and TV/radio presenters will paint as black a picture of Independence as is possible throughout that period, the Yes campaign message will simply not be heard. Social media outlets and citizen journalism websites such as your own, Newsnet Scotland, Wings Over Scotland, Bella Caledonia, National Collective, etc. may narrow the gap between Yes and No, but I fear a gap will nevertheless remain.

    How can this sort of thing be countered: http://newsnetscotland.com/index.php/scottish-opinion/8411-lifted-from-the-internet-the-poisoning-of-the-independence-debate

    or indeed this: http://newsnetscotland.com/index.php/scottish-opinion/8403-the-rajoy-intervention-and-why-the-traditional-media-cannot-now-be-trusted

    …given the nature of MSM which we have in Scotland?

  23. Derek, the issue is not, that we are a mixed bunch with a high percentage of don’t know and don’t care and won’t even vote, but that the UK propaganda system has induced it all.

    We are hearing very concerning reports of schools awareness sessions where only Better Together views are promoted and pupils are ‘directed’ to come up with anti-independence lines which are reinforced by teaching staff and BT invitees. The recent 75% No support poll from a senior school in Moray simply flows against all that conventional polling tells us, so what does this say, given that there would have been a 100% turnout in the school vote; has been some seriously one-sided prompting going on from staff?

    If we are trusting schools to be even-handed and they are demonstrably not being so, does this not present some very pointed concerns for democracy, education and proper school governorship?

    In my view apathy is being inculcated by the UK establishment, it always has been and is currently being done in schools if status quo is the only way ahead on offer. We should be battering all education authority doors down and demanding clarity for our children over this independence referendum, not one-sided carpet-bagging.

    A scourge on these authorities responsible and black shame on us for allowing it to happen to our future generations.

  24. Presume you have now combined blogs 1 & 2 ?
    There has been a slight panic in the blogosphere as some thought something un toward had happened as blog 2 went down 🙂

  25. Don’t be so despondent. There is a long way to go. The argument may have been won amongst the politically aware. But the ordinary voter hasn’t yet engaged in the argument. Politics, all politics is a bit of a turn off for your ordinary punter. But they are listening and hearing things and as the date comes closer and the politicking by the SNP and YES campaigns ramps up a number of gears they will become much more interested. And in the end they will vote with their heart just like they did in 1979, 1997, 2007, and 2011.

  26. Ive got one of those in my team at work Derek, and even when presented with unassailable evidence of the case for independence she will still say NO while she was able to drum the others up in our team isolating me as the odd man out,
    her protestations have become more muted and the others when presented with a sneeky wee email ala mccrone report and such like are all strangely silent

    sofly sofly catchee monkey

  27. […] articles I’ve read this last week was by Derek Bateman, contemplating why it is that so many Scots don’t see why independence should be of interest to them, never mind something they might want to vote […]

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